The impact of glenoid labrum damages on condition of the cartilage of the shoulder joint


  • S.S. Strafun SI “Institute of traumatology and orthopedics AMS of Ukraine”, Kyiv, Ukraine
  • R.A. Sergienko MC “Modern orthopedic”, Kyiv, Ukraine
Keywords: glenohumeral joint, shoulder labrum, cartilage defects of shoulder joint.

Abstract

The joint labrum is an anatomical structure of the shoulder joint, one of the functions of which is to ensure the stability of the shoulder. It has been proven that instability, direct trauma and surgery of any joint eventually lead to cartilage damage and osteoarthritis. It is still unknown whether and how the damage to the joint labrum affect the condition of the cartilage of the shoulder joint. Aim of study – investigation of impact of glenoid labrum damages on condition of the cartilage of the shoulder joint. For the period from 2006 to 2016, on the basis of State Institution “Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics of AMS of Ukraine”, MC “Modern Orthopedics”, Kyiv, a study was conducted on an array of 467 patients. Used clinical diagnostics, MRI diagnostics, arthroscopic diagnostics. Fact verification and localization of joint damage was performed during arthroscopic examination. Localization of cartilage damage was divided into separate areas on the articular surfaces of the shoulder scapula and head. The degree of cartilage damage was classified by Outerbridge. Quantitative analysis of the results was performed using Microsoft Excel in the summary tables. It has been found that damage to the shoulder labrum is the cause of cartilage defects in the joint surfaces of the shoulder. The incidence and severity of cartilage defects increase over time since the injury. The worst prognosis for the development of damage to the articular cartilage is characteristic of patients with damage to the posterior part of the labrum. Thus, damage to the joint labrum is a significant factor in the occurrence of defects in the articular cartilage of the shoulder. Early active surgical tactics for the treatment of damage to the joint labrum are necessary to prevent deterioration of the condition of the joint surfaces and the prevention of osteoarthrosis.

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Published
2019-05-05
How to Cite
Strafun, S., & Sergienko, R. (2019). The impact of glenoid labrum damages on condition of the cartilage of the shoulder joint. Biomedical and Biosocial Anthropology, (35), 62-67. https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.31393/bba35-2019-10